Quotable (#87)

The rise of the Islamic State was clearly anticipated by the American security establishment — it seems — in a manner that can only be considered remarkably relaxed:

According to Brad Hoff, a former US Marine who served during the early years of the Iraq War and as a 9/11 first responder at the Marine Corps Headquarters Battalion in Quantico from 2000 to 2004, the just released Pentagon report for the first time provides stunning affirmation that:

“US intelligence predicted the rise of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS), but instead of clearly delineating the group as an enemy, the report envisions the terror group as a US strategic asset.”

Anybody shocked by this probably hasn’t been paying serious attention.

The Unimaginable

A warning at The National Interest:

COULD A U.S. response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine provoke a confrontation that leads to a U.S.-Russian war? Such a possibility seems almost inconceivable. But when judging something to be “inconceivable,” we should always remind ourselves that this is a statement not about what is possible in the world, but about what we can imagine. As Iraq, Libya and Syria demonstrate, political leaders often have difficulties envisioning events they find uncomfortable, disturbing or inconvenient.

As a general principle, the future can be expected to deliver the ‘unthinkable’. (It’s in our nature to forget, very quickly, how much of that happens.)