Fermi Paradox

It’s worse than you thought:

The Fermi paradox is the discrepancy between the strong likelihood of alien intelligent life emerging (under a wide variety of assumptions), and the absence of any visible evidence for such emergence. In this paper, we extend the Fermi paradox to not only life in this galaxy, but to other galaxies as well. We do this by demonstrating that traveling between galaxies – indeed even launching a colonisation project for the entire reachable universe – is a relatively simple task for a star-spanning civilization, requiring modest amounts of energy and resources. We start by demonstrating that humanity itself could likely accomplish such a colonisation project in the foreseeable future, should we want to, and then demonstrate that there are millions of galaxies that could have reached us by now, using similar methods. This results in a considerable sharpening of the Fermi paradox.

(Via.)

More recent Fermi Paradox sharpening here.

Descending from the abstract plane, there’s this slender thread to hang on to.

2 thoughts on “Fermi Paradox

  1. I choose to believe that the simulation hypothesis is correct and that everything outside our solar system is simulated at a lower resolution. This simplifies things somewhat. Dark matter is evidence that whoever is simulating our universe used a buggy astrophysics package, the planck length is the simulation’s resolution and the lack of alien megastructures is merely a matter of background texture.

  2. Earth came early to the party in the evolving universe. According to a new theoretical study, when our solar system was born 4.6 billion years ago only eight percent of the potentially habitable planets that will ever form in the universe existed. And, the party won’t be over when the sun burns out in another 6 billion years. The bulk of those planets — 92 percent — have yet to be born.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151020104849.htm

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