Quotable (#182)

Seth Myers on “I don’t know anyone voting for Trump”:

Did you ask everybody in your yoga class? Did you check with the entire drum circle because guess what: You know you have that crazy uncle you only see at Thanksgiving? Well, this country is about 48 percent crazy uncles and it’s about to be Thanksgiving all day, every day.

Event Horizon

If this isn’t the greatest short article on financial economics that you’ve ever read, you can get a full refund from me. (UF is probably going to have it tattooed on its abdomen.)

A sample, just to suck you in:

I always knew that ZIRP was bad, but I just thought it would be normal, run-of-the-mill bad. You know, where most normal people get screwed for a long time, and then “suddenly” everything comes unglued and the financial system implodes, followed by a government intervention while the usual suspects (free markets and capitalism) get hung from telephone poles. […] …and then everything would mean revert and overshoot. In this case, interest rates north of 15% (a la 1980), massive debt default, another economic depression, followed by a grand new government intervention, and the blame would be placed squarely at the feet of runaway free markets and capitalism. […] In other words, I have long thought we have been existing at a cyclical extreme on the spectrum of financial repression, which would eventually become untenable and then we’d swing up to the other extreme (of financial repression). […] However lately I have been hearing and reading things that put this scenario, this comfortable (in it’s familiarity) expectation of central bankster boots stomping on my face forever, into doubt. It might end up being a lot worse than that. …

(Plot spoiler — division by zero plays a central role.)

(Via.)

Billionaire Doomsday Bunkers

BDB00

There’s an enticing slide-show at Forbes.

Once each member’s private accommodations are completed, furnished and fully outfitted, their respective quarters will be locked and secured, limiting access to their families and staff prior to lockdown; while Vivos will operate and maintain all common areas (under and above-ground) pending a catastrophic event. […] Members will arrive at their own discretion, prior to lockdown, landing their private planes at nearby airports. Vivos helicopters will then be deployed to rendezvous with each member group, and safely fly them back to the shelter compound, behind the sealed gates from the general public.

The Vivos slogan is deep: Next Generation Underground Survival Shelter. Whichever way you break it up, it spits out strange and ominous signs.

Quick links (#30)

Osnos on Xi Jinping (related). Still throbbing in the Western media, the China crisis drum beat. Reincarnation politics. Siberia won’t be changing hands.

Singapore after LKY. Vietnam’s moment? North Koreans in Cyberspace. Twilight of the EU. Yemen collapses. Where the super-rich live. The rich and powerful are different. A de-pinkering world.

Reach for the sky. Minsky’s moment?

Bitcoin in space, and on Wall Street. Asteroid mining 101. Silicon Valley’s smartest decisions. 21. AI almost ready for business. Jobless growth. Beyond hacked fridges. AI’s PR problem (e.g. 1, 2). Father Time is getting tired. Thiel turns to biotech.

Umbral moonshine. Evolution is machine learning. Pre-deployed extraterrestrial colonization infrastructure. The universe is collapsing. At the edge of experimentation.

The Dutch East India Company (video).

Acceleration in Vice. The poverty of acceleration. #Accelerate recommended.

Robotics in SF. More robots. Design fiction. Cyberspace must die. VR digest (huge). Materials project.

Cognitive Anthropocene. Fully automated luxury communism. “Fundamentally, socialist politics are rooted in the idea that democracy should be radically extended from the political sphere into social and economic life.” Against exit. Radical chic. Pointless argument. Communism (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6). Tech critique needs more communism (response).

Catastrophe by default. Tulipmania. Feminist cybersecurity. Afrofuturism (and on film).

Interviews with Bratton, Dryhurst, Graeber. Srnicek on urban struggle (video). Zizek reviewed. The Alexander-Eisenman debate.

Negate thyself. Sounds of Dark Matter (1, 2, 3).

Gibson’s Nightmare

At the most superficial level, there’s probably some sleeplessness accompanying the anxiety that the whole of The Peripheral — once people have processed it — begins to look like a piece of fabulously ornate, maze-patterned wrapping paper for the four pages that really matter. There’s the Great Pacific Garbage Patch elsewhere, along with ubiquitous near-future drones, and – further down the time-line — some exotic neo-primitivist adornments — but basically, if you’ve read Chapter 79, you’ve got the thing. Yes, that’s to miss out on some of the time-travel structure, but Gibson takes such a lazy approach to that (deliberately suppressing all paradox circuitry) it’s no great loss.

On the positive side, those four pages are really something. Chapter 79 is helpfully entitled The Jackpot, and contains what might well be the most profound reworking of apocalypticism of modern times. There are some (fairly weak) remarks here. Perhaps somebody has already contributed some better commentary, that I’ve missed.

The Jackpot is a catastrophe with a fruit-machine model — all the reels have to click together ‘right’ for it to amount to disaster. It’s therefore poly-causal, cross-lashed, or “multiplex” — eluding narrative apprehension through multiplicity.

… it was no one thing. … it was multicausal, with no particular beginning and no end. More a climate than an event, so not the way apocalypse stories liked to have a big event, after which everybody ran around with guns … or else were eaten alive by something caused by the big event. Not like that.

It was androgenic … Not that they’d known what they were doing, had meant to make problems, but they’s caused it anyway. And in fact the climate, the weather, caused by there being too much carbon, had been the driver for a lot of other things.How that got worse and never better, and was just expected to, ongoing. Because people in the past, clueless as to how that worked, had fucked it all up, then not been able to get it together to do anything about it, even after they knew, and now it was too late.

It kills 80% of the world’s human population in the end.

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Twitter cuts (#14)

This is getting intense: