Quotable (#210)

Go on, tell me this isn’t trolling:

On one occasion I even, I am ashamed to admit, very diplomatically expressed negative sentiments on Islam to my wife. Nothing “overtly racist”, just some of the “innocuous” type of things the YouTubers had presented: “Islam isn’t compatible with western civilisation.”

She was taken aback: “Isn’t that a bit … rightwing?”

I justified it: “Well, I’m more a left-leaning centrist. PC culture has gone too far, we should be able to discuss these things without shutting down the conversation by calling people racist, or bigots.”

The indoctrination was complete.

ADDED: Called it. (I’m not going to pretend it was hard.) So deep inside their OODA loop it’s simply cruel at this point.

Onion-tier

Seriously?

It’s possible that a time will come in which a parent must explain their divorce to their child. […] However, it’s guaranteed that a time will come in which a parent must break the news of a celebrity’s divorce to their kids. […] Today, it was announced that Angelia Jolie has filed for divorce from Brad Pitt. The news was so massive, that a literal earthquake happened at the time of the press release. […] And as a parent in the year 2016, it is absolutely your responsibility to tell your kids about this divorce in a way for them to understand and respond in an emotionally healthy way. […] You might ask, “Well, what if my kids don’t know who Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are? Why should I explain the divorce to them then?” […] Again, it is your responsibility to educate your children about celebrity culture. If your kids don’t know about Brangelina, you need to write the term on the blank side on an index card right now. …

(An impressive number of Mashable readers seem to have been trolled hard by this.)

Quotable (#182)

Seth Myers on “I don’t know anyone voting for Trump”:

Did you ask everybody in your yoga class? Did you check with the entire drum circle because guess what: You know you have that crazy uncle you only see at Thanksgiving? Well, this country is about 48 percent crazy uncles and it’s about to be Thanksgiving all day, every day.

Twitter cuts (#120)


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Quotable (#171)

Mike Judge’s Silicon Valley in The New Yorker:

The show’s signature gag, from the first season, was a minute-long montage of startup founders pledging to “make the world a better place through Paxos algorithms for consensus protocols,” or to “make the world a better place through canonical data models to communicate between endpoints.” This scene was set at TechCrunch Disrupt, a real event where founders take turns pitching their ideas, “American Idol”-style, to an auditorium full of investors. Before writing the episode, Judge and [Alec] Berg spent a weekend at TechCrunch Disrupt, in San Francisco. “That’s the first thing you notice,” Judge said. “It’s capitalism shrouded in the fake hippie rhetoric of ‘We’re making the world a better place,’ because it’s uncool to just say ‘Hey, we’re crushing it and making money.’” […] … Roger McNamee, who has been a successful tech investor since the late eighties, told me, “When I first met Mike, I asked him, ‘What’s the gestalt you’re going for with this?’ His answer was, ‘I think Silicon Valley is immersed in a titanic battle between the hippie value system of the Steve Jobs generation and the Ayn Randian libertarian values of the Peter Thiel generation.’ I had never articulated it that well myself, and I lived it!” McNamee recently wound down his most recent venture fund, which he co-founded with Bono; he now spends most of his time touring the country with his two jam bands, Moonalice and Doobie Decibel System. He continued, “Some of us actually, as naïve as it sounds, came here to make the world a better place. And we did not succeed. We made some things better, we made some things worse, and in the meantime the libertarians took over, and they do not give a damn about right or wrong. They are here to make money.”

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