Kant around the back

Schmidhuber exemplifies the path, while talking about robots:

One important thing about consciousness is that the agent, as it is interacting with the world, will notice that there is one thing that is always present as it is interacting with the world — which is the agent itself.

(Some room for quibbling, but it doesn’t get serious. This is where transcendental subjectivity comes from.)

Quotable (#193)

Lessons from zombie-psychosis:

Cotard’s Syndrome—in which a person can believe that they’re dead, that their organs are rotting, or that they don’t exist—was first identified by the French neurologist Jules Cotard more than a century ago, in 1882. But the condition is so rare that it’s still far from fully understood. […] … But Cotard’s Syndrome isn’t simply interesting from a neuroscience or psychological perspective. In the world of artificial intelligence, roboticists are working to build ever-more complex machines that replicate human behavior. One of the central questions is whether machines can truly become self-aware. Could understanding Cotard’s Syndrome provide the answer?

This could go so wrong …

Sensitive Interface

Swiss banking giant UBS wants to talk to you about robotic emotion simulation, for some reason. It’s not at all badly done (irrespective of what it’s selling).

Building on [Herbert A.] Simon’s achievements in the field of artificial intelligence, we take a journey to explore the latest innovations in AI and, most importantly, its human element, to ultimately answer the controversial questions: What physical human characteristics and emotions must a robot have to make people react to it? And, obversely, Can AI recognize human emotions? …

The ad (if that’s what it is) has interactive features that seek to make some of its questions performative. It begins to fold back upon itself only in the final section, when it suggests:

Breakthroughs in data processing and conversation systems are helping more and more companies to implement AI in their operations. According to some experts, well-advanced artificial intelligence could someday not only assist businesses in doing their jobs more efficiently, but also bring a more human touch back to customer service, leading consumers to prefer sophisticated and professional AI service to today’s human variety.

Puzzle resolved. We’re exploring a projection of UBS’s customer interface, from the near future.